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dc.contributor.advisorRhoades, Marty B
dc.creatorCampbell, Terra N
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-13T20:42:38Z
dc.date.available2016-10-13T20:42:38Z
dc.date.created2016-08
dc.date.issued2016-09-13
dc.date.submittedAugust 2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11310/92
dc.description.abstractGreenhouse Gas (GHG), Ammonia (NH3), and Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) emissions from confined animal feeding operations (CAFO) are an emerging concern due to the potential harm to human and animal health and the environment. A study was conducted to determine the effects of three levels of condensed tannins (0, 0.5, and 1.0%, DM basis) fed to 27 beef steers on NH3 and GHG emissions from manure. Manure and urine were collected from two periods over 6 days. Feces and urine were placed in inert plastic containers and stored separately at -4o C until analysis. Feces and urine were placed in 16.7 x 16.7 x 17 cm plastic chambers and urine was topically added. Gas samples were collected every 24 hours for 1 week, then every 48 hours for 1 week. Headspace samples were injected into a GHG gas chromatograph (GC) for analysis. NH3 concentrations were measured using a handheld electronic gas detector. H2S concentrations were measured using a Jerome 631-x hydrogen sulfide analyzer. Tannin inclusion at the 0, 0.5, and 1.0% treatment levels showed a 0, 51, and 57% reduction of NH3 concentrations in the headspace, respectively (P<0.001). Tannin inclusion in the diet increased CO2 headspace concentrations (P=0.028). There was no treatment effect on N2O emissions, (P≥0.123). Results indicate that condensed tannins fed to beef cattle can effectively reduce gaseous NH3 emissions from confined beef animal facilities.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectair quality, emissions, manure, volatilization
dc.titleMANURE AMMONIA AND GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS FROM CONDENSED TANNIN FED BEEF CATTLE
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2016-10-13T20:44:46Z
thesis.degree.departmentAgricultural Sciences
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant, Soil, Environmental Science
thesis.degree.grantorWest Texas A&M University
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameM. S.
dc.type.materialtext
dc.creator.orcid0000-0002-8556-0167


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